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Contractors World 2011 Volume 2 Issue 1
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[Three new C Series excavators from Case . . . cont]

The three C Series models feature up to 6% more lift capacity and boast increased operating weights to tackle bigger jobs. The CX250C excavator has an operating weight of 25,100 kg (55,400 lb), and the CX300C and CX350C have weights of 29,900 kg (65,900 lb) and 36,300 kg (80,000 lb), respectively.

Improved operator comfort, visibility

“With the new excavators, operators benefit from working in a more spacious, comfortable and quiet cab,” O’Brien said. Noise reduction improvements, including vibration refinement on the cab’s reinforced “A quiet, comfortable cab helps the operator be more productive.” tubular structures, create an extra-quiet cab environment, with automotive-like noise levels as low as 69.9 d(B)A. “It’s like being in a car even when the excavator is running at full throttle,” he said.

“A quiet, comfortable cab helps the operator be more productive.”

The cab on the new Case excavators provides 7% more overall space and 25% more airflow. Air conditioning performance also has increased by 8%.

New is a rear-view camera that feeds video to a 7 inch LED monitor in the cab to expand the operator’s view around the machine. “The monitor is large and clear, comparable to what you’d find in a luxury automobile,” O’Brien said. The operator can easily switch between rear and optional side camera views. Plus, they have simultaneous visibility to key operating data, including a new function which provides fuel consumption per hour.

email the companyCase Construction (North America) •


The Liebherr LR 13000 crane was assembled with a main boom of 60 m in length, a 54 m derrick boom, 400 tonnes of superstructure ballast, and suspended ballast of 1,500 tonnes.Liebherr LR 13000 crawler crane passes load test with flying colours.

A few weeks ago, the new LR 13000 from Liebherr for the first time lifted a load of more than 3,000 tonnes. With a test load of 3,371 tonnes at an outreach of 16 m the nominal load from the table of 2,697 tonnes was proved.

The crane was assembled with a main boom of 60 m in length, a 54 m derrick boom, 400 tonnes of superstructure ballast, and suspended ballast of 1,500 tonnes. This was the heaviest weight which has ever been lifted by a Liebherr crane, and to set up the enormous load the company had to construct a special load traverse arrangement.

An even greater increase is planned for early in 2011. The LR 13000 will be equipped with a new type of heavy-lift boom, which has been dubbed the P-boom – “Power boom“.

With this system, the new crane should then be able to deal with a load of 3,750 tonnes, meaning that the nominal load of 3,000 tonnes will be tested and approved. This year will still be seeing the assembly and testing of a main boom 120 m in length.

With the LR 13000, the most powerful crawler crane in the world of conventional design, Liebherr is extending its range of crawler cranes, steadily upwards. The most important area of operations for the new LR 13000 will be in the power station construction sector. With nuclear power stations of the latest generation in particular, the lifting of extremely heavy individual items is essential, while preassembled modules also have to be lifted as complete units, and that also drives the unit weights upwards.

But in refineries, there is an increasing demand for industrial columns weighing 1,500 tonnes and with lengths of 100 m to be erected. Larger and larger cranes are also needed for the pre-assembly of offshore steel structures, such as oil platforms.

Against this background of the enormous size and capacity of the new 3,000 tonner, one major consideration was a practical concept for the economical transport of the crane components. The result is that no single component exceeds a transport weight of 70 tonnes.

The ballast slabs, made of concrete and weighing 25 tonnes, have precisely the dimensions of one 20 foot container, and can be lifted and loaded with a spreader and Twistlock locking system. This concept has already proved to be a really excellent solution: when first testing the LR 13000, a total counterweight of 1.900 tonnes was used.

email the companyLiebherr •

 

 

 

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