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Contractors World 2011 Volume 2 Issue 7
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PowerscreenTwo screening units + picking station

The Powerscreen Warrior 1800 is used primarily to remove dirt from mined debris. Originally it was used to screen both new and mined materials in conjunction with the picking station.

 

“The Warrior 1800 is fitted with a fingered screen, which is good for mined materials that have a lot of dirt mixed in,” says landfill Operations Manager William ‘Tom’ Lewellen.

“It’s great for getting the fines out. Both incoming new debris and mined materials that have had the dirt removed are then processed through the Warrior 2400, which is a heavy-duty machine with an extra-large hopper and is equipped with optional punch plates instead of fingers; so dirt and small materials fall through, while the most worthwhile recyclables remain. Thus, there is very little clogging, and any clogs that do occur are easy to free up.“ Although punch plates are used extensively in many countries they are not so well appreciated in the USA.”

Operations Manager William 'Tom' Lewellen.Lewellen further explained that the Warrior 1800 has a standard rubber feed belt, which is fine for mined materials with their high dirt content. The Warrior 2400, however, has an optional metal feed belt, which is much better for handling the new, incoming construction debris. The metal belt gives smoother operation, has a larger screen area, is more durable than rubber, and materials are less likely to get hung up in it.

Operations Manager William ‘Tom’ Lewellen.

Lewellen emphasized that portability is also important, “Moving either machine takes just the push of a button and off it goes. The tracks easily handle rough, uneven ground; they don’t get mired down in mud like wheels do.”

“Screened materials are deposited onto a beltline that runs through a portable, 22 m long picking station with up to six large bins positioned under it. Each dumpster is designated for a recyclable material: typically two for woods, two for metals, one for concrete, and one for cardboard. Depending on beltline volume, 12 to 20 workers pick out recyclable materials from the belt, which are dropped into the bins below. Filled bins are removed by truck as needed and replaced with empties Non-recyclables drop off the beltline at end of the station in a stockpile and is removed by a front-end loader.

“Before we bought the Warrior in 2009,” Lewellen says, “we looked at various types and brands of screening equipment. First we tried a trommel, but it clogged way too much. We also tried other kinds of equipment that were not satisfactory, including a star screen that wouldn’t do what the manufacturer said it would. It simply wasn’t designed for our kind of application, though we still use it sometimes in a secondary capacity.

“So we continued our search but only Powerscreen Mid-Atlantic, the Powerscreen distributor brought their machine—the Warrior 1800—in for a demo on site, processing our material. They also took me to a landfill in North Carolina to see a unit working and to talk with the owner about it. Based on all that, buying was an easy decision, and it has proven to be a very wise investment.

“Using the two Warriors and the picking station has doubled our production,” Campbell added. “In 2010, Potomac produced 27,000 tonnes of recyclable materials - that is, materials that did not have to be sent to landfill. “

For more information click as appropriate:
• Potomac Landfill Inc
• Powerscreen Mid-Atlantic
• Powerscreen

 

 

 

 

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