Contractors World
 
Contractors World - INTERNATIONAL
The free digital publication for
construction, demolition, mining and quarrying industries.
 
Contractors World INTERNATIONAL - 2016 Vol 7 No 2

Cookie Policy: To respect your privacy, this site makes minimal use of cookies that are purely to help in page navigation. No personal data is collected.
previous page   PAGE 11 of 73    next page

Contractors World Magazines

More reports in Contractors World UK & Ireland


BREAKING NEWS


LIBRARIES

• back issues
•  brochures
•  videos


recent issues

cw
No: 2 2017

cw
No: 1 2017

cw
No: 6 2016

 


 

 

The Kusile power station project, which is located near the existing Kendal power station, in the Nkangala district of Mpumalanga, will comprise six units, each rated at an 800 MW

Luffing cranes on Kusile Power Plant projectSouth Africa

Luffing cranes on Kusile Power Plant project

Although it is one of Africa’s largest economies, South Africa is struggling with energy shortages.

The construction of two new power plants within the country aims to remedy this situation and to stabilize the power supply in the long term.

The Kusile power station project, which is located near the existing Kendal power station, in the Nkangala district of Mpumalanga, will comprise six units, each rated at an 800 MW installed capacity for a total capacity of 4,800 MW. Once completed, Kusile will be the fourth-largest coal-fired power station in the world.

The Kusile project includes a power station precinct, power station buildings, administrative buildings (control buildings and buildings for medical and security purposes), roads and a high-voltage yard.

The associated infrastructure will include a coal stockyard, coal and ash conveyors, water-supply pipelines, temporary electricity supply during construction, water and wastewater treatment facilities, ash disposal systems, a railway line, limestone offloading facilities, access roads (including haul roads) and dams for water storage, as well as a railway siding and/or a Railway line for the transportation of the limestone supply.

The power station will be the first in South Africa to install flue-gas desulphurisation (FGD) – a state-of-the-art technology used to remove oxides of sulphur, such as sulphur dioxide, from exhaust flue gases in power plants that burn coal or oil.

This technology is fitted as an atmospheric emission abatement technology, in line with current international practice, to ensure compliance with air-quality standards, especially since the power station is located in a priority air shed area.

continued >>>


previous page   PAGE 11 of 73    next page

 

 

«  Previous

 

Next  »