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Contractors World - INTERNATIONAL
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construction, demolition, mining and quarrying industries.

 
Contractors World INTERNATIONAL - 2016 Vol 7 No 4

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No: 6 2016

 


 

 

 

Tate Modern Gallery's Ultra-Futuristic Extension - page 3 of 6

Ramboll’s passion for design is seen throughout this building, with countless numbers of concrete options explored for the exposed areas, to be sure of the best end result.

Ramboll’s passion for design is seen throughout this building, with countless numbers of concrete options explored for the exposed areas, to be sure of the best end result.

The lower floors of the new building and the partially rebuilt Switch House floors boast incredibly large rooms with spans of up to 18 m. Achieving these clear spans, whilst being able to accommodate the essential loading conditions for the gallery, was very important for Tate Modern’s displays.

The construction methods are as unique as the structure itself, with brick being used in a way never previously thought possible.

It is a real privilege to have played such a pivotal role on the Tate Modern extension. From threading the buildings foundations around the oil tanks to defining the structure and the building envelope, we’ve helped realise the architectural vision and played an integral role in creating an iconic building that reflects the status of Tate Modern’s brand.

said Martin Burden, Director Ramboll.

Pairs of bricks are bonded with polymerised mortar and then connected together with elastomeric joints and stainless steel pins. Swift Brickwork Contractors Limited and Swift Scaffolding Limited had to design processes, tools and plant to tackle this challenging building.

Extensive off site prefabrication was used to minimise the effects of weather delays. 3D setting out tools were invented for the project, to ensure that tolerances of +/- 2mm were maintained over the 65 m high façade.

Onsite installation works started in November 2014, with the project being handed over in May 2016.

The building’s distinctive and complex geometry impacted many aspects of the building’s construction, from the brick arrangement, to the windows and precast façade panels, the internal structure and the scaffold. 

Switch station and oil tanks: an ideal opportunity to expand

It was always envisaged that the derelict oil tanks and the switch station to the south of the site could eventually be integrated into the gallery.

The building’s distinctive and complex geometry impacted many aspects of the building’s construction, from the brick arrangement, to the windows and precast façade panels, the internal structure and the scaffold.

The electrical switch station is still used to power a large part of the City and South London. EDF, who own the station, are modernising their equipment so it will take up a smaller part of the building.

This provided the ideal opportunity to expand Tate Modern, with the oil tanks forming the foundation of the new building.

The extension provides 22,000 m² of additional space for Tate Modern.

T.E. Scudder Ltd was awarded the enabling works package to facilitate the construction of various new structural elements within the Turbine Hall in order to provide connectivity between the new and the old Tate Modern buildings.

page 4 of 6 >>>


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