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Contractors World

 
Contractors World - INTERNATIONAL
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construction, demolition, mining and quarrying industries.

Contractors World International- 2017 Vol 8 No 2

 


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This is the first time that the station, which has a re-locatable design to cope with life on a floating ice shelf, has been moved since it was towed from its construction site to its present location in 2012.

 

 

British Antarctic Research Station Halley VI Relocation Completed - continued

This is the first time that the station, which has a re-locatable design to cope with life on a floating ice shelf, has been moved since it was towed from its construction site to its present location in 2012.

British Antarctic Research Station Halley VI Relocation Completed   The station sits on Antarctica’s 150 m thick Brunt Ice Shelf. This floating ice shelf flows at a rate of 0.4 km per year west towards the sea where, at irregular intervals, it calves off as icebergs.

Halley VI research station is crucial to studies into globally important issues such as the impact of extreme space weather events (for example solar storm-induced electricity blackouts could cost more than $40 billion), climate change, and atmospheric phenomena.

It was scientific investigations from this location that led to the discovery of the Antarctic Ozone Hole in 1985.

Director of BAS Professor Dame Jane Francis reflected:

The relocation is a terrific achievement for our operational teams. Everyone who has worked so hard is absolutely buoyant about the success of the move.
   They talk about the great collegiality, what a great team they made, and how much they will miss working together. They are very proud of what they achieved – and I am proud of them all.

Ramboll engineer, Ben Rowe, provided structural support to the Halley relocation project team, and earned the nickname ‘Calc’ for his mental arithmetic during on site discussions. Relocated for the first time

The Halley VI relocation team has carried out for the first time what the station was designed to do – move.

Meticulous planning and a professional operation leaves the station in excellent condition for science and support teams to resume their work in the next Antarctic summer.

Ramboll engineer, Ben Rowe, provided structural support to the Halley relocation project team, and earned the nickname ‘Calc’ for his mental arithmetic during on site discussions.

Ramboll UK

 


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